Kadir van Lohuizen speaks on BBC World Service Podcast

Listen now to Kadir van Lohuizen speaking on the first episode of the BBC World Service 3 part podcast series "The History of Wastefulness" that investigates how poor waste management across the world has led to a garbage emergency.

Link the podcast: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/w3csy52r?fbclid=IwAR2YV2HQM100U7x2cnhc9nYpb1Fna_CDEwWNcCyc_il1HB2rong6bMkbb9g

 Nigeria, Lagos, 27 January 2017

A man carries a huge back of pet bottles collected for recycling at the Olusosun landfill.
The Olusosun landfill in Lagos receives between 3-5000 tons per day and is about 45 ha in size. About 5000 scavengers work here and often also live. They collect anything that is recyable like plastics, textiles, electronics, paper etc. The problem is that the landfill is full and the city wants to close it down. The question is where it will go, there are no incinerators and the infrastructure to formally recycle is lacking. There is one other landfill, but it needs to close as well.

Remarkable is that the landfills in Lagos smell less compared to other landfills in the world: Nigerians throw away less food, because they either finish their plate or feed it to the animals.

Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR

NOOR showcases 2018 Nikon-NOOR Academy Second Session Students' Projects

NOOR is proud to share the projects of 2018 Nikon-NOOR Academy Second Session students.

NOOR visual-storytellers Benedicte Kurzen, Sanne De Wilde, Francesco Zizola, Sebastian Liste, Jon Lowenstein, Tanya Habjouqa, Kadir van Lohuizen and Leonard Pongo led 49 students in the masterclasses held in Italy, Hungary and Switzerland. During four intensive days of the Nikon-NOOR Academy, each group reviewed and shared their portfolios, listened to presentations by the photographers, held in-depth discussions on practical and creative issues, and edited their visual stories.

The masterclasses have been made possible thanks to the generous support of Nikon Europe.

 

Italy

2018 Nikon-NOOR Academy Second Session

Participants in Italy:


Alessia Rollo
Camilla Ferrari
Camilla Piana
Camillo Pasquarelli
Elias Holzknecht
Elisabetta Zavoli
Emilienne Malfatto
Francesca Volpi
Giulia Frigieri
Lucas Bäuml
Marco Tiberio
Michele Spatari
Stefano Sbrulli
Valeria Cherchi

 

Participants in Hungary:


Aleksandra Bardas
Andras Polgar
Andrea Alai
Elena Anosova
Elipe Mahe
Istvan Bielik
Istvan Juhasz
Jeanne Frank
Marton Monus
Nik Neubauer
Pavel Bogolepov
Pavel Nasadil
Pavlo Bishko
Stanislava Novgorodtseva
Tamas Soki
Viktoryia Gerasimava
Zsolt Balazs
Zuzana Gogova

Hungary

2018 Nikon-NOOR Academy Second Session

 

Switzerland

2018 Nikon-NOOR Academy Second Session


Participants in Switzerland:


Anne Ackermann
Charlotte Hooij
Claudia Schildknecht
Florian Spring
Hugh Kinsella Cunningham
Kristina Steiner
Lukas Kreibig
Marion Bernet
Matthieu Zellweger
Meinrad Schade
Nadia Natascha Horsted-Narejo
Nathalie Taiana
Nicholas Constant
Olivia Sasse
Ronald Pizzoferrato
Tamina-Florentine Zuch
Tim Rod

Photojournalist Kadir van Lohuizen & Pole traveler Bernice Notenboom talk about the effects of the melting ice-caps in the Arctic

Photo by Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR for Carmignac Fondation

Dedicated to the Arctic and chaired by Jean Jouzel, and under the patronage of Minister Ségolène Royal, French Ambassador for the Arctic and Antarctic Poles, the 9th edition of the Carmignac Photojournalism Award was awarded to Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir Van Lohuizen (NOOR). Their investigative photoreportage «Arctic: New Frontier» is a pioneering double expedition which explores the effects of climate change on the entire Arctic territory. They want to experience the dramatic transformation of natural landscapes and the demographics in the Arctic, and the impact of these changes on the lives of the region’s inhabitants.

With amongst others

  • Kadir Van Lohuizen | Photographer and journalist
  • Bernice Notenboom | Pole traveler
  • Othniel Art Oomittuk Jr | Inupiaq artist

"The photos of Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen are superb. Through them, from Siberia, Svalbard and Greenland to Canada and Alaska, we discover the Arctic of today, with its landscapes and wildlife that are drawing a growing number of tourists, as well as its populations who are exposed to extreme climates and who mine resources such as nickel and, increasingly, gas, oil and coal. Protecting the environment does not appear central to their activity, to put it mildly." —Jean Jouzel, climatologist, winner of the 2012 Vetlesen Award and co-winner of the 2007 Nobel Peace Award as Director of the IPCC

The moderator of this event is Saccomani Clément.

Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR Arctic, Alaska, Point Hope, whale hunt

SEVENTY YEARS OF SUFFOCATION - Tanya Habjouqa with Amnesty International

Photo by Tanya Habjouqa/ NOOR

2018 marks 70 years since the expulsion and displacement of more than 700,000 Palestinians from their homes, villages and cities during the one-year conflict that created Israel in 1948. Since then, the Nakba (catastrophe), as it is known in Arabic to Palestinians, has been engraved in Palestinian collective consciousness as a story of relentless dispossession.

We are proud to share this new digital plateform where NOOR's Tanya Habjouqa collaborated together Amnesty International in producing this immersive photo-story on 70 years of Palestinian displacement.

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TIME's top 100 photos of 2018

Photo by Yuri Kozyrev / NOOR for Carmignac Fondation

Yuri Kozyrev's & Kadir van Lohuizen's latest project, Arctic: New Frontier, is in TIME's top 100 photos of 2018. Their Arctic project is laureate of the 9th Prix Carmignac du photojournalisme.

 Murmansk Russia September 2018:
 Nakhimov Naval School in Murmansk 
the Russian government paid great attention to patriotic education of the new generation, 

Under the decision of the Russian President Vladimir Putin, there have nine presidential
Cadet and Nakhimov schools established countrywide over the last five years. In total, there are 29 pre-higher education schools in the Russian Federation.

Talk with NOOR’s photographers Tanya Habjouqa, Jon Lowenstein, Léonard Pongo

Photo by Keystone

Keystone-SDA, NOOR Foundation and Nikon Europe invite to join for an evening with NOOR’s award-winning photographers Tanya Habjouqa (JO/US), Jon Lowenstein (US), Léonard Pongo (BE).

« Intimacy of place and the tools of telling »

NOOR photographers will share key insights used to develop personal projects and their unique paths through photography. They will share previously unseen work and explore how to move beyond a linear narrative. Join us for an evening conversation to transcend what has been strictly documentary into a new terrain of documentary photography by incorporating the humane, personal, and collaborative into the unexpected.

The conversation will be hosted in English by Agata Bar, Editorial Director at NOOR Images. Afterwards there will be the opportunity for personal conversations at the Daizy Bar.

Public event – Please register your participation by email marketing@keystone-sda.ch.

The three NOOR photographers will be in Zurich from 3 to 6 December, 2018 on occasion of an international Masterclass program, run by Keystone-SDA’s partner agency NOOR and graciously supported by Nikon Europe. Read more about the 2018 Nikon-NOOR Academy.

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#BlackFriday_ the impact of waste to our planet_Wasteland

Photo by Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR

On America's most wasteful weekend, #BlackFriday, we look back at the impact of waste to our planet with Kadir van Lohuizen's project Wasteland in the Washington Post. The world generates at least 3.5 million tons of solid waste a day, 10 times the amount a century ago, according to World Bank researchers. On average, Americans throw away their own body weight in trash every month.

 Nigeria, Lagos, 27 January 2017

A man carries a huge back of pet bottles collected for recycling at the Olusosun landfill.
The Olusosun landfill in Lagos receives between 3-5000 tons per day and is about 45 ha in size. About 5000 scavengers work here and often also live. They collect anything that is recyable like plastics, textiles, electronics, paper etc. The problem is that the landfill is full and the city wants to close it down. The question is where it will go, there are no incinerators and the infrastructure to formally recycle is lacking. There is one other landfill, but it needs to close as well.

Remarkable is that the landfills in Lagos smell less compared to other landfills in the world: Nigerians throw away less food, because they either finish their plate or feed it to the animals.

Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR