Robin Hammond

 
How we see the world has an impact on how we interact with it. But much of our world, outside of our immediate community, is hidden or not seen with an understanding of the people concerned. I believe visual storytelling can reveal and humanise conditions we are unfamiliar with or don’t comprehend. It is my hope that my work can achieve this, create connection and result in a positive impact on the lives of the people I document.
— Robin Hammond

Bio

 

Based in Manchester, United Kingdom

Available for commissions
& assignments

The winner of a World Press Photo prize, the RF Kennedy Journalism Award, three Pictures of the Year International Awards, the W.Eugene Smith Award for Humanistic Photography, and the recipient of four Amnesty International awards for Human Rights journalism, Robin Hammond (New Zealand, 1975) has dedicated his career to documenting human rights and development issues around the world through long term photographic projects.

In 2015 Robin was named by Foreign Policy as one of the “100 Leading Global Thinkers”. He has published two books, both as the result of awards. First, after being awarded the Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award, was his book on life in Zimbabwe under the rule of Robert Mugabe, ‘Your Wounds Will Be Named Silence.’ Secondly, his long term project on mental health in Africa, ‘Condemned,’ which was published after winning the FotoEvidence book award for documenting social injustice. His third book, ‘My Lagos’, has been published in July 2017.

Robin has made a wide variety of other photographic bodies from the impact of climate change on Pacific Island communities to rape used as a weapon of war in Congo and Bosnia, to the poisoning of ecosystems by multi-nationals in developing countries.

His latest work on homophobia and trans-phobia around the world, ‘Where Love Is Illegal’, has become a popular social media campaign gaining 100,000 followers in the first three months after it launched, and has been exhibited around the world and featured in many publications including on the cover of Time Magazine. It was the subject of his TEDx Talk delivered in November 2015.

Robin is the founder of Witness Change, a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing human rights through highly visual story telling.

His work has appeared on television, online and worldwide in magazines and newspapers. He is a National Geographic and Time Magazine contributing photographer.


Selected Stories

 

Where love is illegal

Fortunately, in many places, there has been great progress in the movement for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (“LGBTI”) rights in recent years, including an increasing recognition of same-sex marriage. Nevertheless, nearly 2.8 billion people live in countries where identifying as LGBTI is subject to rampant discrimination, criminalization, and even death.Indeed, same-sex acts are illegal in 75 countries;in five, one can be put to death. Behind these statistics, there are millions of individuals with unique, often harrowing stories.

Where Love Is Illegal was created to tell those stories.

Robin Hammond collaborated with the subjects to create the portraits, giving them veto rights over the photographs, andeach person wrote and recorded their own testimony. For many, it was the first time they had told their story.

Before, pervasive bigotry and discrimination had rendered them silent.

 

The New Europeans

The Syrian and other refugees streaming into Europe since 2015 have roiled politics and inflamed debate. But Europe’s newest arrivals are just the latest of many waves of immigrants since World War II. Indians in Britain, Algerians in France, Somalis in Sweden are some of the populations who have reshaped the continent. Since World War II, Europe has become home to a third of the world’s immigrants and the continent now has foreign-born populations comparable to that of the United States.

 Robin Hammond travelled through Europe to tell the stories of ‘The New Europeans’ – Syrians in Germany, Algerians in France, Turks in Germany, Somalis in Sweden and South Asians in the United Kingdom.

The Next bread basket

Can Africa’s fertile farmland feed the world? Robin Hammond travels through six sub-Saharan African countries in search of an answer.

 

nine lives

Nine-year olds are in the middle of childhood but old enough to have sage views on gender, and how it affects their potential and limitations. They are aware of how life would be different if they took on another gender, how it can influence their future careers and the benefits of being either a boy or a girl.


News, Education & Exhibition


From The NOOR Shop

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My Lagos | Book

 
 Sheep and goats walk from Berbera National Health Quarantine, which has capacity to hold 120,000 animals. (Contact Du Abdallah Mohamed Fahiem +252634590591) to Berbera Port where they are loaded onto boats and exported. Berbera, Somaliland. 03 October 2013.  Over 50% of Somalilands GDP is made up of livestock exports. Most of these animals start their journey from the port of Berbera. Here stockmen herd the sheep and goats onboard boats destined for Saudi Arabia, in time for the annual Haj. The UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation estimates that $250m-worth of animals will leave the port of Berbera and its more ramshackle rival, Bossaso, in the seven weeks before the haj. Berbera Port Authorities estimate 1.3 million animals go through the port in the high season leading up to Haj. The export of livestock through these ports, and the nearby port of Djibouti, represents what is said to be the largest movement of live animal - 'on the hoof' - trade anywhere in the world. Photo Robin Hammond/Panos (pictures@robinhammond.co.uk) Land Grab MM8247. Writer: Joel Bourne (jkbourne2@gmail.com). Photo Editor: Sarah Leen (sleen@ngs.org). Fixer: Ali jama (ajaamac1@gmail.com phone: +252634416613)
 

The Next Bread Basket | Print

 
 A goat herdering family in the Sheikh Mountains between Burao and Berbera (names withheld). The family sells their goats to traders who take the animals to Burao Livestock Market where they are purchased for export to Saudi Arabia and other countries in the region. Sheikh Mountains, Somaliland. 06 October 2013.  Over 50% of Somalilands GDP is made up of livestock exports. Most of these animals start their journey from the port of Berbera. Here stockmen herd the sheep and goats onboard boats destined for Saudi Arabia, in time for the annual Haj. The UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation estimates that $250m-worth of animals will leave the port of Berbera and its more ramshackle rival, Bossaso, in the seven weeks before the haj. Berbera Port Authorities estimate 1.3 million animals go through the port in the high season leading up to Haj. The export of livestock through these ports, and the nearby port of Djibouti, represents what is said to be the largest movement of live animal - 'on the hoof' - trade anywhere in the world. Photo Robin Hammond/Panos (pictures@robinhammond.co.uk) Land Grab MM8247. Writer: Joel Bourne (jkbourne2@gmail.com). Photo Editor: Sarah Leen (sleen@ngs.org). Fixer: Ali jama (ajaamac1@gmail.com phone: +252634416613)
 

Goat Hearding in the Sheikh Mountains
Print